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Tips For Working With Recruiters

Confidentiality

First and foremost, insist on confidentiality. Be sure the recruiter you are working with will not send out your CV without your prior knowledge and permission. The specific details of a practice should be presented to you and your interest confirmed before your CV goes out to the practice. It is not a good idea to give carte blanche permission to any recruiter to submit your CV anywhere they deem appropriate.

Many recruiters have networks which share physician CV's. This kind of activity can absolutely enhance your search, but, again, insist on authorizing the distribution of your CV. The firm sharing your CV with other firms should do so only with your specific permission for specific jobs. Otherwise, one submittal of your CV to a recruiter could result in dozens of firms calling you.

Recruiters who are members of the reputable, National Association of Physician Recruiters (NAPR), must abide by a strict Code of Ethics. There is an Ethic's Committee which handles complaints against its members and issues sanctions for non-compliance. Ask your recruiter if they are a member firm.


Fees

Under no circumstances should a physician be charged a fee for a recruiter's help. Recruiters are paid by the group or hospital they are representing. There are two kinds of fee arrangements that recruiters have their clients --- either contingency or retained. Contingency is the most common and involves a contract whereby the recruiter is only paid for the successful placement of a physician with the practice. A retained agreement is typically exclusive (the client is only working with that one recruiter) and involves the recruiter being paid some monies by the client up front, and at various intervals during the search process.


The Recruiter's Job

Working with a recruiter is much like working with a realtor. You share with the recruiter the kind of position you are looking and your locations of interest. It is then the recruiter's job to identify and present to you practices that meet your specifications. Once you find the job you want, the recruiter helps to facilitate contract negotiations, licensure, and events leading up to your start date.


Rapport

As with all service personnel we encounter in our lives, rapport is important. Work with a recruiter with whom you feel there is trust and rapport. If you don't like someone, don't work with them. Working with the largest and most prestigious placement firm in the country will not guarantee you good service and rapport.


Ask Your Friends

As with realtors, your physician friends and colleagues can be a great source of referrals to recruiters they've enjoyed working with in the past.


Specialization

Many recruitment firms work with only one or two specialties --- or they may be regionally focused. Your search will be advanced by working with someone well versed in your specialty and who knows well the area of the country that interests you. A recruiter living in Tennessee, for example, will be hard pressed to appropriately present to you the practice climate and desirability of communities in Oregon.


Lots of Recruiters

If you are a graduating resident, fellow or in a scarce specialty, recruiters will find you! If you follow the (above) guidelines about confidentiality, you should be able to manage the calls and emails. Begin by presenting your requirements to one or two recruiters, and then expand if you're not getting the results you want. You will find ads online and in journals. Also, do not be surprised if more than one recruiter presents to you the same job opportunity. Most major clinics and hospitals have found their recruitment efforts are enhanced by having contingency agreements with more than one recruitment firm.


Your Responsibility in the Search

The following is essential to the process:

  • Recruitment help is only as good as the information you provide. You need to carefully evaluate your needs and interests and communicate them to the recruiter.

  • Don't forget the needs of your spouse of significant other! You'd be amazed to know how many physicians, at the last minute, say, "oh yeah, my wife's a Pathologist and she needs a job too." It is your recruiter's job, though, to cover this with you.

  • Respond when your recruiter contacts you.

  • Be honest. It has been said that the second best thing you can tell a recruiter is "no." If he or she presents a job or location that simply doesn't interest you, just say so. No use wasting your time, their time, the hospital CEO's time, the practice's time, etc.


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    Article Contents
  Confidentiality
  Fees
  The Recruiter's Job
  Rapport
  Ask Your Friends
  Specialization
  Lots of Recruiters!!
  Your Responsibility in the Search
  TOG Home
  Return to Candidate Resources









"Work with a recruiter with whom you feel there is trust and rapport."




















"Begin by presenting to one or two recruiters, and then expand if you're not getting the results you want."



















"Respond when your recruiter contacts you."
 
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